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HAIR , SKIN & NAILS



Hair, skin, and nails can easily become dry and brittle if they do not receive the nutrients they need. B complex vitamins, such as vitamin B7 (biotin) and specalised formulas are great for keeping these parts of the body looking and feeling great, while nut oils, such as coconut and almond oil, can help to supply moisture.

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HAIR , SKIN & NAILS

Vitamin B7- Biotin (Also Called Vitamin H) Vitamin B7 is a vitamin that is water-soluble; this means the kidney filters out whatever excess we have in our blood. B7 is an essential vitamin, and like the other B vitamins, helps the body metabolize fats and protein and turns carbohydrates into glucose energy. Our body requires the B complex of vitamins, as they contribute to healthy skin, eyes, hair, and liver. They also help the brain function normally and promote healthy nerve conduction. Biotin is widely recommended for healthier hair and nails and is found in many different beauty products. Bacteria in the gut produce biotin, so it is rare to have a deficiency. Biotin is also critical for embryo growth during pregnancy. Reasons to Take Vitamin B7 • Suspected deficiency, as evidenced by hair loss, dry scaly skin, mouth angles cracking, tongue swelling and painful, dry eyes, depression, appetite loss, fatigue, insomnia, high cholesterol, and heart disease • Prolonged use of an IV for nutrition • Long-term use of antibiotics • People with malabsorption from intestinal disease • People with a removed stomach • Genetic deficiency of biotin • For thin, brittle, splitting hair and nails • For people with spotty hair loss (alopecia areata), usually combined in a cream of steroid and zinc • For diabetics, usually paired with chromium to reduce blood sugar • To help symptoms of peripheral neuropathy • Infants with seborrheic dermatitis (cradle cap) Daily Intake Recommendation Since Biotin deficiency is so rare, there is no recommended daily amount (RDA) or recommended nutrition intake amounts (RNI). Normal daily-recommended intakes are: Infants & Children: 0-3 years: 10-20mcg 4-6 years: 25mcg 7-10 years: 30mcg Adolescents & Adults: 11 years and older: 30-100mcg What if I Take Too Much? Biotin is not known to be toxic. In fact, there is only one reported case of a problem following high-dose biotin ingestion. Due to the lack of cases, no upper limit for safety has been documented. Long-term supplementation will cause the other B vitamins to be imbalanced. All B vitamins should be supplemented if one is supplemented. The best way to do so is with a B complex vitamin, or multivitamin daily. Who Is at Risk for Deficiency? Those people with/ who: • Genetic biotin deficiency • IV Nutrition long-term • Consume raw egg whites regularly (binds to biotin and prevent absorption) • Are pregnant • Are on antiepileptic drugs that can deplete biotin • Have liver disease and may have higher requirement • Malabsorption due to intestinal disease Natural Food Sources of Biotin • Biotin is present to a small degree in many foods, but less so than other B vitamins. • Rich sources of biotin are found in egg yolks, liver, and yeast. • The bacteria in the intestine are producers of biotin, but how much and to what benefit is uncertain. Best Ways to Take This Supplement Biotin is widely available in the oral formulation of a B complex vitamin or a multivitamin, or they can be found as a separate vitamin. Biotin comes in many doses, such as 10mcg, 50mcg, and 100mcg tablets. They can also come with or without brewer's yeast. If you have any questions or concerns, you should contact your medical provider. Filtur is happy to help with any of your supplement needs.