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MINERALS



Minerals are chemicals which are essential to help the body to function properly. Some of the most common minerals in the body are calcium, potassium, and magnesium. Mineral deficiencies such as iron are very common, which can affect the health. Mineral supplements help fill the deficiencies and support a healthy lifestyle. 

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MINERALS

Zinc is an essential mineral for the body. It is known as a trace element because very little is needed for overall health, but it has a big job to do. Your body needs zinc for proper maintenance and growth. It is essential for blood clotting, thyroid function, immune function, maintaining vision, wound healing, and more. Reasons to Take Zinc You may know that zinc can help fight the common cold virus and is often sold for that purpose, but zinc is used to treat and prevent many other conditions: • Macular degeneration • Male infertility caused by low hormone levels • Impotence • Prostate problems • Canker sores • Dermatitis • Bedsores • Cataracts • Loss of appetite • Low immunity • Genital herpes • Binge eating disorder • Osteoarthritis • Hair loss • HIV • Lupus You can see how this trace element is important, even in small amounts. Recommended Daily Allowance The recommended daily allowance of zinc is 15 milligrams for adults. You can take different dosages depending on the reason why you are taking the supplement. For example, you can take 100 milligrams a day to treat anorexia, 200 milligrams three times a day to treat ulcers, or 15 milligram a day to treat osteoporosis. If you're unsure how much to take for your health concerns, always discuss it with your doctor. What If I Take Too Much? You should never take more than 40 milligrams of zinc a day unless you are under doctor's orders. Too much zinc can cause diarrhea, damage to the kidneys and stomach, vomiting, nausea and a metallic taste in the mouth. Diabetics should not take large doses of zinc. It can lower blood sugar. Who's At Risk for Deficiency? People with malabsorption syndromes are at risk. There are certain people who are at a higher risk of zinc deficiency than others: • Infants • Pregnant women • Elderly who don't eat well • Vegetarians • Diabetics • Alcoholics Long-term alcohol use causes poor zinc absorption putting alcoholics at high risk of deficiency. Even though zinc deficiency is not a common problem, you should know the symptoms: • Slowed growth • Loss of appetite • Low insulin levels • Irritability • Hair loss • Rough, dry skin • Slow wound healing • Poor sense of smell and taste • Diarrhea • Nausea Low zinc levels may also be associated with male fertility issues, type 2 diabetes, major depression, HIV, and sickle cell disease. Zinc deficiency can also cause vision changes or problems. Natural Food Sources of Zinc Most people can get the zinc they need from their daily food intake. Some good sources of zinc to include in your diet are as follows: • Cooked oysters • Clams • Crab • Red meat • Poultry • Beans • Fish If you feel you can benefit from zinc supplements or you don't really like the zinc-rich foods, you can discuss a safe dosage for you with your doctor based on your health needs.