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GLUTAMINE



Glutamine is an amino acid, naturally produced by the body's muscles. Glutamine is essential for many bodily processes, but as a supplement it is thought to support the immune system and digestive system, particularly during recovery from illness or stress. Glutamine is also used to treat ulcers, and may help to boost athletic performance.

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GLUTAMINE

L Glutamine Glutamine is a non essential ɑ-amino acid that becomes conditionally essential under specific circumstances, requiring you to consume it through your diet or a supplement. In the aftermath of an injury, or following some very strenuous exercise the human body requires more glutamine. You may then need to take L Glutamine to meet the needs of your body, which stores glutamine in the muscles and lungs. Use of L Glutamine as an immune system and intestinal health compound Glutamine has a vital role to play as a fuel source of choice over glucose for the intestinal as well as immune system. In individuals who have experienced extreme stress, physical trauma, muscular wounds, surgery or illness that results in muscles wasting away, an L Glutamine supplement is useful. For those with AIDS too, glutamine can help reduce the muscle mass loss and build muscle. The importance of L Glutamine  The body needs Glutamine for the biosynthesis of proteins, this is much like the other proteinogenic amino acids of the body.  The acid-base balance of the kidneys is maintained with the help of glutamine that is used to produce ammonium.  It is a favoured energy source for cells, after glucose.  Aids anabolic processes like purine synthesis.  In the blood, glutamine acts as a nontoxic transporter for ammonia  For some people, consuming Glutamine has helped them to cut down their sugar cravings .  Malnourished cancer patients who are being treated with radiation or chemotherapy as well as patients having bone marrow transplants can also sometimes benefit from L Glutamine. Sources of L Glutamine Glutamine is abundant in human blood and has a typical concentration of 500–900 µmol/l. However, for those who follow a vegetarian or vegan diet, a supplement may be needed . Additionally, those who have a diet with low dairy consumption as well as those who undertake long spells of endurance exercise will need to take Glutamine supplements or up their intake of glutamine rich foods. These supplements come in tablet, capsule, liquid or powder form. Take care to consume L Glutamine at room temperature or cold as heat can destroy it and render it ineffective. Glutamine rich diet While glutamine can be produced by the body, when you need supplementary intake through diet there are some sources of the amino acid that you should include in your plan. • Get in your dairy in the form of yogurt or milk with granola or in a porridge every morning. • Cheese lovers can enjoy cottage cheese grilled or in a sandwich, or spiced ricotta fritters dotted with vegetables. • End the meal with Glutamine high, with some ricotta cheese mixed with honey and fresh fruit. • If you like keeping it light, toss up a beautiful salad with chicken, cabbage leaves and liberally sprinkle on the raw parsley. Vegetarians can enjoy a version that replaces the chicken with dried lentils, peas or beans. • Whizz up a healthy drink of fresh organic raw spinach leaves along with your fruit juice. • For heavier meals, beef, fish, pork or chicken can be served up, cooked lightly to give you the additional glutamine you need. • Anyone with liver or kidney disease, psychiatric disorders, Reye syndrome or a history of seizures, as well as the elderly should avoid consuming glutamine supplements.