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THREONINE



Threonine is an amino acid which maintains the proper balance of proteins in the body. Turkey, shellfish, liver, cheese and lentils are all natural sources of threonine, but it can also be taken as a supplement, in which form it is thought to help combat leaky gut syndrome.

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THREONINE

L-Threonine This essential ɑ-amino acid is required for synthesizing proteins and needs to be consumed via inclusion in the diet, or through a nutritional supplement of L-Threonine. Use of L-Threonine L-Threonine, a dietary amino acid, is an important residue of proteins like elastin, tooth enamel and even the all important collagen. Since it is a precursor of glycine, it is utilized to elevate glycine levels in the brain. Found mostly in the central nervous system, this amino acid is useful for battling depression. The importance of L-Threonine  This essential amino acid is required for the synthesis of serine and glycine that are needed to produce the body’s collagen, elastin and tooth enamel. Due to its role in producing these building blocks of the body, it also keeps the skin supple and teeth strong . It also helps with good heart health, keeping it elastic and strong.  Threonine is required for proper fat metabolism which helps prevent fat build up in the human liver, circumventing future liver failure.  It is also utilized to treat indigestion as well as intestinal problems.  Some cases of mild depression as well as anxiety have been treated with Threonine.  Threonine strengthens the immune system , since it helps in the production of antibodies.  The body needs adequate quantities to recover from injuries and to build strong bones.  It is also used for the treatment of nervous system disorders like multiple sclerosis and spinal spasticity, though research on the extent of effectiveness is still underway. Sources of L-Threonine Threonine is not produced by the body and needs to be taken in via diet or if suggested for some individuals, as a supplement. L-Threonine is the naturally occurring form of the essential amino acid and is commonly found in some easily available foods. Threonine is found in ingredients like fish, poultry and meat, as well as cottage cheese, lentils, black turtle bean as well as sesame seeds. L-Threonine rich diet L-Threonine is found in high quantities in meats, poultry, soybean, eggs and spirulina, to name a few. Here are some easy ways to include ingredients like these in your daily diet.  Enjoy a turkey breast roasted in the oven, to take care of 60 to 70 percent of your daily recommended intake of Threonine. Each breast of 863 gm, contains about 11 gm of the nutrient .  Beef lovers can tuck into a Thai style beef salad with roast sirloin steak cut into strips for a tangy, spicy twist on the meat. Or go traditional with a steak with a healthy side salad. Whatever you choose, stick to lean cuts to stay healthy. A 700 gm portion of raw beef, which cooks into about 570 gm of roast pack has 5.9 gm of L-Threonine.  Dried spirulina or raw soybeans contain about 3.2 to 3.3 gm of L-Threonine per cup and can be added to a vegan diet.  In winter, there’s nothing like a hearty beef or chicken stew to hit the spot, so go ahead and enjoy a one-pot meal.  Go Mexican with chicken quesadillas and a side salad of spicy salsa with L-Threonine rich lentils stirred through to accompany a portion of nachos. Very high doses of L-Threonine could cause disruption in the functioning of the liver and must therefore be taken in recommended quantities only.