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TEFF FLOUR



Teff is the Ethiopian grain used to make injera flatbreads. Teff flour is gluten free, rich in iron and calcium and contains many amino acids. This low fat, low sodium grain can help you to feel fuller for longer and can contribute to good heart health and lower cholesterol.

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TEFF FLOUR

Teff is a poppy seed sized ancient grain that’s loaded with nutrients and has been a staple in countries like Ethiopia for centuries. Uses of teff flour Teff flour is gluten-free, making it perfect for the millions of people around the world who are sensitive to gluten or have celiac disease. What’s more it is a high protein grain and a rich source of calcium as well. Why it’s good for you Teff flour is a nutritious alternative to regular grains that we have in our diets. The ancient grain is being touted by some as the new quinoa.  A single cup of cooked teff has as much as 123 gm of calcium content. The NHS recommends a daily intake of about 700 mg for adults to regulate muscle function in the body (including the heart), build strong teeth and bones and to facilitate normal blood clotting.  For those with Coeliac disease, a carefully chosen diet is the key to living a normal, healthy life. Teff is one of the few grains that are included in a list of suitable ingredients for someone with this problem.  Since teff has a low glycemic index, it is great for anyone who need to control blood sugar levels or is trying to lose weight.  The high fibre content in teff is great for your body. Fibre helps the body reduce cholesterol levels in the blood and keeps the digestive system working well.  The grain also contains numerous micronutrients. Where to find Teff Flour Teff flour production is limited with Ethiopia curbing the amount and form in which the grain can be exported. Cakes, biscuits and injera are widely exported by the country and can be found in speciality food stores and larger groceries and health food outlets. It is not a cheap grain, owing to the low yield per hectare (1.4 tonnes) compared to that of modern wheat varieties (3.2 tonnes). Incorporating Teff Flour into your diet Teff flour has traditionally been used by generations of Ethiopians in a national staple ‘injera’ a sourdough flatbread accompaniment to their curries and meat. Here are some other ways you can cook with teff flour.  Whip a batch of crepes made with teff flour and combine them with fresh fruit for a healthy treat on weekends.  Enjoy the nutty flavour of this ancient grain in a waffle that incorporates apple juice.  Bake a batch of banana bread, trading some wheat flour for an equal amount of teff instead.  Give your baking a traditional Ethiopian twist, with a special yam bread made with teff flour, yams, leeks, collard greens and spices.  You may also want to experiment with it in steamed recipes or even make some flatbread of your own to go with a curry dinner. Or swap your slice of sourdough bread with a batch of injera for dinner.