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VITAMIN B1



Vitamin B1 is also known as thiamine. It is essential for a healthy circulation, and plays an important role in brain function and the nervous system. Sources of vitamin B1 in the diet include fortified cereals, whole grains, yeast, seeds, nuts and liver, and it can also be taken as a supplement.

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VITAMIN B1

Vitamin B1- a vital nutrient to keep your body functioning at its best Vitamin B1 or Thiamine is a B complex vitamin that is found in many foods. It is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in many bodily functions such as the nervous systems, heart and muscles. Thiamine got its name because it was the first of the B complex vitamins to be found and it was also one of the first of any vitamins to be classified. How does Thiamine or Vitamin B1 help? Thiamine or Vitamin B1 supports the flow of electrolytes in the body through nerves and muscles and it helps the enzyme processes and carbohydrate metabolism. It has be found beneficial in treating a number of conditions like heart disease, and motion sickness. Thiamine or Vitamin B1 appears to be particularly helpful in managing age related diseases such as: • Cataracts and Glaucoma • It is one of the treatment methods for Alzheimer’s Disease, where it is found to improve the patient’s cognitive functioning. • It promotes better overall brain functioning and ailments that may impair mental abilities in older individuals. Vitamin B1/ Thiamine is known as the anti- stress vitamin because it enhances our ability to manage our mood and physiological impairments that occur as a result of excessive stress. It actively enhances learning ability, increases vitality and energy and prevents memory loss. Good sources of Thiamine or Vitamin B1 According to the NHS, adults should take in Vitamin B1 in the following amounts each day: - 1 mg for men - 0.8 mg for women. Vitamin B1 or Thiamine is ingested and absorbed through the small intestine. Since it has a very short half life, thiamin does not last long when it is stored in your liver and you need to take in a continuous supply of the nutrient to keep your body working at peak efficiency. You can get this vitamin from many food sources including: - cereal grains - pork - yeast products - oatmeal - flax - oranges - soy beans - liver - potatoes - pasta - legumes - fruits - whole grain - eggs Typically, a varied, balanced diet should give you all the thiamine you need. A deficiency can lead to the dreaded beri beri disease apart from nervous, gastrointestinal problems and muscular pains. Agitation, depression, emotional upheavals and insomnia may also indicate low levels of thiamine or Vitamin B1. In summary, - Vitamin B1 is essential for many critical functions involving the heart and nervous system - It helps regulate the flow of electrolytes through the body and supports enzyme processes - It is beneficial in treating age related diseases - The Vitamin B1 levels need to be replenished on a regular basis by including the right kind of foods in the diet